1000 Guineas Stakes (G1)

The fairer sex proved the stars across the world last year, Winx in Australia, Almond Eye in Japan, Monomoy Girl in America and Enable in Europe. All multiple G1 winners who also caught the public’s imagination.

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Will we see another star filly this year, one that could reach the heights achieved by those mares?

Almond Eye won the Japanese 1000 Guineas last year, adding the Japanese Oaks and St Leger later in the season. It’s been a long time since that has happened in England, 1985 to be precise when Sir Henry Cecil trained Oh So Sharp to win the Fillies Triple Crown.

Could the gap be bridged this year?

Qabala is favourite for the first leg, the 1000 Guineas tomorrow. Roger Varian’s filly won her maiden over 7F at the end of September punted from 11/2 to 7/2F. She won a head, safe to say they knew what they had. She reappeared in the Nell Gwyn Stakes and was an impressive winner coming through the pack to win going away. The issue is there was no early pace so did the run flatter to deceive?

She’ll be accompanied to the post by her stable companion Mot Juste, a G3 winner last year who ran second to her in the Nell Gwyn.

Next best of the English is Dadhnu who was also a trial winner at Newbury taking the Fred Darling a short head from Iconic Choice.

The Irish challenge is deep both numerically and in quality, Skitter Scatter, Iridessa, and Fairyland are all G1 winners.

As juveniles Skitter Scatter took the Moyglare for Patrick Prendergast at the Curragh 2 L from Lady Kaya over seven furlongs with Hermosa a further 1¼ L behind in a taking performance. She’s now under licence to John Oxx. Iridessa gave Joseph O’Brien his first G1 win in England taking the Fillies Mile from Hermosa by 1½ L while Fairyland for Aidan O’Brien took the Cheveley Park over 6F.

Roll on this year to Leopardstown for the 1000 Guineas Trial and it was Lady Kaya who put in the authoritative performance to beat Happen and Iridessa. No doubt the third will improve for the run but so will the winner.

Aidan O’Brien also runs two juvenile G2 winners in Just Wonderful and Fleeting. Just Wonderful, the Rockfel winner over 7F here will have Ryan Moore in the plate while Fleeting, the May Hill winner over a mile at Doncaster has been nibbled at in the market backed from 28/1 to 16/1 since this morning.

Sheila Lavery’s filly Lady Kaya is the fairy tale winner, from a small stable, purchased for buttons and owned within the trainers family she had 10 L to spare over Pink Dogwood last August, now favourite for the Oaks.

Her overall level of form gives her every chance and she’s had the experience of going to Newmarket for the Cheveley Park, albeit it wasn’t as pleasant as she would have liked, trying to make all she folded coming out of the dip to finish to finish sixth. She may well benefit from that now. By sprinter Dandy Man the trip is a concern though there was no sign of her weakening over 7F at Leopardstown.

She won’t win a triple crown but she might turn out to be a very nice miler.

Recommendation: Lady Kaya 14/1 win

Follow the 2019 G1 Pattern Racing year in championship format by clicking on the links below.

PRWC 2019 Horse, PRWC 2019 Jockey, PRWC 2019 Trainer, PRWC 2019 Sire, PRWC 2019 Owner, PRWC 2019 Breeder

View last years championships here by clicking on the links below.

PRWC 2018 Horse, PRWC 2018 Jockey, PRWC 2018 Trainer, PRWC 2018 Sire, PRWC 2018 Owner, PRWC 2018 Breeder

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The 2000 Guineas Stakes (G1)

We’re already well into the worldwide G1 pattern racing season, you can track it here, Winx and Beauty Generation top the PRWC Horse 2019 standings after lighting up the early part of the year with three G1’s each.

We kicked off the G1 European season last Sunday in the Prix Ganay and this week we move to Newmarket for Guineas weekend. In America Churchill Downs hosts the Kentucky Oaks and Derby.

Will we see a top-class three-year-old this year?

One capable of bouncing from one G1 to another remaining unbeaten from here to the end of the season, one capable of stepping up from a mile to 10f and then to a mile and a half, one capable of taking on and beating the older generation over those longer trips?

It’s a decade since Sea The Stars.

As is often the case come the 2000 Guineas, there’s a few of those who set the standard as juveniles missing here. Too Darn Hot, Ouorto and Mohaather met with setbacks in the build-up while Calyx and Persian King were rerouted.

It’s led to the not unfamiliar situation where Ballydoyle provides the favourite and second favourite for the Guineas today. Ten Sovereigns a speedy sort by No Nay Never has usurped Magna Grecia as favourite as Ryan Moore has been booked for the ride. He is unbeaten in three juvenile runs over 6F, the last in the G1 Middle Park where he was a classy winner over Jash. Is sprinting his game?

Magna Grecia had a similar end of season campaign, three runs, a Naas maiden win followed by a neck second to Persian King at Newmarket and then a win in the G1 Vertem Futurity Trophy Stakes at Doncaster over a mile.

The Irish presence is boosted by Madhmoon from the Kevin Prendergast stable. Also thrice run, he won a Leopardstown maiden in August and then beat Broome in the Junevile Stakes last Irish Champions weekend in September, both over a mile. Broome boosted the form with a good second in the Prix Jean-Luc Lagardere over Arc weekend and then bolted up in the Ballysax this term. Madhmoon went off favourite for the Guineas Trial at Leopardstown in April but found the Ballydoyle inmate Never No More who had the benefit of a winning run (entered in the Irish 2000 Guineas) a ½ L too good on that occasion.

Madhmoon leaves the ring after tasting victory first time out at Leopardstown

Willie Haggas’s Skardu heads the English challenge on the back of his Craven win, he had a neck to spare over Momkin. As a trial, the Craven hasn’t produced a Guineas winner since Haafhd in 2004 though Masar’s win last year and subsequent Derby win has done a lot to reestablish the race’s credentials even if Masar couldn’t win the Guineas. Skardu had the one run last year, he was a shock 33/1 winner of a 7F maiden over this course in September.

Royal Marine and Al Hilalee represent Godolophin. The latter is somewhat of a surprise package, a maiden winner last year here over the July course he followed up with a listed win in Deauville beating Duke Of Harzand a short head who reopposes here. He spent the winter in Dubai and did a racecourse gallop two Saturday’s ago at Meyden arriving back to Newmarket on Sunday and was supplemented for the race on Monday. The former pipped Broome in Paris in the Prix Jean-Luc Lagardere. A trip on Dirt at Meydan didn’t work, he could only manage fourth, a spot he also filled when going off favourite for the Craven Stakes.

Marytn Meade’s Advertise possibly represents the strongest juvenile form. He was beaten twice in a five-runner campaign, Calyx got the better of him in the Coventry at Royal Ascot when they were split by the width of the track and Too Darn Hot put him in his place in the Dewhurst when leaving him comfortably 3 ½ L in arrears. In between, he won the G2 July Stakes at Newmarket and went to the Curragh to win the G1 Phoenix Stakes over 5F.

It’s an open Guineas with the loss of too many principles to answer the question we posed earlier, will we see a superstar three-year-old this year? Caylx’s win at Ascot yesterday suggests these are an above average bunch and he’ll now go down the sprinting route. The setbacks to Too Darn Hot and Ouorto means it’s too early to give us a definitive answer as to how good this crop is. The suspicion is that they are good, a cut above the norm, the premise built largely on the back of Too Darn Hot.

In the meantime, Madhmoon can put down a marker, his two-year-old form too was very good. He’ll come on a great deal from his Leopardstown seasonal debut in April where the 7F trip was too short for him and the soft ground against him. He’ll relish the step back up to a mile here and he’ll love the fast ground even more.

Recommendation: Mahmoom 8/1 win

Follow the 2019 G1 Pattern Racing year in championship format by clicking on the links below.

PRWC 2019 Horse, PRWC 2019 Jockey, PRWC 2019 Trainer, PRWC 2019 Sire, PRWC 2019 Owner, PRWC 2019 Breeder

View last years championships here by clicking on the links below.

PRWC 2018 Horse, PRWC 2018 Jockey, PRWC 2018 Trainer, PRWC 2018 Sire, PRWC 2018 Owner, PRWC 2018 Breeder

Pattern Racing World Championships 2018 – Horse

This is the second in a series of blogs reviewing last years global Group One Pattern Races. 

It’s fitting on the eve of her last ever run tomorrow we honor Winx.

The Pattern Race World Championships

Each race is allocated 10 points for a win, 7 points for second and 5 points for third, points scored in each race are accumulated and presented in championship format with categories for Owners, Trainers, Jockeys, Breeders, Sires, and Horses.

Horse Category

Today we will review the Horse category.

Winx tops the Horse Table

Podium Position Horse1st Place Points 2nd 
Place Points
3rd Place Points
Total
Points
1 Winx
No Of Places
70 
(70)
0
(0)
0
(0)
70 
(7)
2 Monomoy Girl No Of Places 50
(5)
7
(1)
0
(0)
57
(6)
3 Accelerate No Of Places 50
(5)
0
(0)
0
(0)
50
(5)

Australia’s wonder mare is exactly that, in 2016 she won six G1’s. In 2017 she repeated the achievement and was PRWC champion on 60 points. In 2018 she added another G1 to make it seven wins amassing 70 points, a score no horse has ever amassed in the six-year history of these championships. It is testament not only her brilliance but also her massive level of consistency.

She is ever the champion, retirement means she won’t do the treble in the Pattern Racing World Championships in 2019 however a win at her home track Randwick in the Queen Elizebeth Stakes means she will sit top as she exits the stage. A third G1 in 2019, ever a champion.

The debate about Winx and Cracksman, equally rated as the worlds best racehorses on a mark of 130 is a non-runner for us here at Pattern Racing. Cracksman ran four times in 2018 winning three and was second in another collecting 37 PRWC points. His winning G1 trio were the Prix Ganay, Coronation Cup and Champion Stakes, only Poets Word got the better of him in the Prince of Wales’s Stakes at Royal Ascot.

Winx’s did a magnificent seven last year and added a pair this year, a win tomorrow will give her a world record 25th Group 1. Her versatility means she is capable over distances from seven furlongs to a mile and a quarter on ground from heavy to good. Class.

Some question what she’s beat, this is a nonsense argument, it’s the manner of how she beat them, it suggests anything in front of her come the furlong pole will be dominated and behind her come the line.

He’s Eminent will shine a light on the Cracksman argument. He was 11L adrift of Cracksman at Royal Ascot last year in the Prince Of Wales’s Stakes and he’s put in a smart performance running second on his Australian G1 debut to Avilius in the Ravnet Stakes. Avilius then went on to win the G1 Tancred Stakes a week later.

Winx won’t beat He’s Eminent 11L but she doesn’t have too. Her career is littered with class, finding the line when it matters.

Last year’s Cox Plate, her fourth win in the race was a performance of pure quality, to do it in her fifth year competing on the track is astounding. And to be back, attempting to win her 25th G1, what a wonderful bonus for racing fans.

We will miss her.

2018 was a great year for fillies and mares. Not only was there Winx to admire, there was also Monomoy Girl in America. She finished second with 57 points, five wins and a second including the Kentucky Oaks and Breeders Cup Distaff for the 3yo, masterful work by her trainer Brad Cox.

Accelerate ran third with five wins from five runs finishing off with the Breeders Cup Classic. It’s a position he equaled in the World’s Best Racehorse Rankings.

Over the course of the next few months, we will review the remaining four categories, Jockey, Trainer, Breeder and Sire.

You can follow the story of the 2019 G1 Pattern Race year by clicking on the links below. There you’ll find how this years G1’s run so far have panned out in a championship format. Compare to last year also.

PRWC 2018

PRWC 2019 Horse, PRWC 2019 Jockey, PRWC 2019 Trainer, PRWC 2019 Sire, PRWC 2019 Owner, PRWC 2019 Breeder

Pattern Racing World Championships 2018 – Owner

On the eve of the third running of the Pegasus Invitational, we will take a chance to review last years global Group One Pattern Races.

There is a hierarchy in The Pattern Race system, races are graded either G1, G2, G3 or Listed class, over 1,500 globally. The grading determines the hierarchy with G1 status elevating a race to the highest level. There were 314 G1 races run across the globe last year. 

The Derby, Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe, Cox Plate and Breeders Cup Classic, all for older horses are the top G1 races in their respective countries. There are top two-year old G1 races, the Dewhurst, Prix Marcel Boussac, Golden Slipper or Breeders Cup Juvenile, less lucrative in terms of prize money, stepping stones to the bigger races.

G1’s are run on dirt and turf, over distances between five furlongs and twenty furlongs, can be restricted to age groups or same sex.

We treat them equally to establish a world championships including all 314 G1’s.

The Pattern Race World Championships

Each race is allocated 10 points for a win, 7 points for second and 5 points for third, points scored in each race are accumulated and presented in championship format with categories for Owners, Trainers, Jockeys, Breeders, Sires, and Horses.

Owner’s Category

Today we will review the Owner’s category, without them there wouldn’t be any racing, they are the bill payers.

For Godolphin 2018 was a great year, a resurgence, they top the Owners Table.

Godolphin are Number 1 in the PRWC 2018 Championships – Owner Category

Podium
Position


Owner
1st
Place
Points
2nd
Place
Points
3rd
Place
Points

Total
Points 
1Godolphin
No Of Places
300
(30)
119
(17)
95
(19)
514 
(66)
2Coolmore
No Of Places
140
(14)
161
(23)
145
(29)
446
(66)
3Qatar Racing
No Of Places
50
(5)
28
(4)
10
(2)
88
(11)

The boys in blue finish top of the PRWC 2018 – Owner’s Category, a position they last held in 2015 beating Coolmore, winners in 2017 and 2016. Both made the rostrum sixty-six times, the thirty wins for Godolphin the deciding factor.

They scored their first points in February in Australia with a win by Hartnell in the Orr Stakes and finished the year with a third place in the last G1 in America, the La Brea Stakes on the 26th December.

They are truly a worldwide outfit operating across all major racing jurisdictions with an ever-widening net. England is the home to their principle trainers, Saeed bin Suroor and Charlie Appleby who provided a large haul of their points however the yards of James Cummings in Australia, Andre Fabre in France and Yoshitada Takahashi in Japan all won G1’s with horses entrusted to them, others also contributing to achieving their 514 points winning total.

Here is a table of points achieved by their trainers

 

Godolphin Trainers                                 
1st
Place
Points
2nd
Place
Points
3rd
Place
Points

Total
Points
Charlie Appleby (ENG)1202120161
Saeed bin Suroor (ENG)90285123
James Cummings (AUS)602815103
Andre Fabre (FR)10283068
Yoshitada Takahashi (JPN)200020
H-A Pantall (FR)07512
Clive Cox (ENG)0707
Willie McCeery (IRE)0055
Thomas Albertrani (USA)0055
Charlie Hills (ENG)0055
Bob Baffert (USA)0055
Total Points Scored30011995514

Coolmore, the “lads” interests merged under the one banner, finished second on 446 points. In contrast to Godolphin the points accumulated over the season primarily come courtesy of trainer Aidan O’Brien and the Ballydoyle operation. There are contributions also from Andre Fabre, Chad Brown and Mark Casse.

 

Coolmore Trainers             
1st
Place
Points
2nd
Place
Points
3rd
Place
Points

Total
Points
Aidan O’Brien (IRE)140154130424
Andre Fabre (FR)07512
Chad Brown (USA)0055
Mark Casse (CAN)0055
Total Points Scored140161145446

The dominance of the leading pair is apparent. Qatar Racing’s total of 88 might be a distance behind the front two however it is still a great feat to reach the rostrum. John Gosden, David Simcock in England and Chris Waller in Australia were their contributors.



Qatar Racing Trainers   
1st
Place
Points
2nd
Place
Points
3rd
Place
Points

Total
Points
John Gosden (ENG)400545
David Simcock (ENG)107522
Chris Waller (AUS)021021
Total Points Scored50281088

Owners are brave people, often forgotten and unappreciated. We take for granted the amount of money they put into the game yet for most there is little prospect of getting it back. They are the wealthy playing the sport of kings. For most the dream – to have a horse carry their colours to a place finish in a G1 is that – a dream. Only 449 of them scored points across the world. They deserve the happiness a podium finish brings them. Congratulations if your one of them.

Over the course of the next few months we will review the other categories.

You can follow the story of the 2018 G1 Pattern Race year by clicking on the links below. There you’ll find how the 314 G1’s run during the year panned out in a championship format.

PRWC 2019 Horse, PRWC 2019 Jockey, PRWC 2019 Trainer, PRWC 2019 Sire, PRWC 2019 Owner, PRWC 2019 Breeder